game
photo
retro
rant
Not logged in. · Lost password · Register

All content © NFGworld, unless otherwise noted, except for stuff we stole. Contact the editor-in-chief : baldbutsuave@thissitesdomain, especially if you are an attractive young female willing to do nude photography modelling. All rights reversed. 907

Now: the official Wikileaks thread
submit to reddit
Author name #16
Avatar
Member since Sep 2007 · 176 posts · Location: Kobe, Japan
Group memberships: Citizens, Members, The Cabal, Underground
Show profile · Link to this post
Here is an interesting Article which unpacks the various laws people are trying to say that Wikileaks has broken.
It certainly shows why the American government is trying to retrospectively change some laws to be able to charge Assange with something, or...well...anything that will actually stick.
“Be conservative in what you do; be liberal in what you accept from others.” J. Postel
This post was edited on 2010-12-15, 09:06 by Unknown user.
Author name (Administrator) #17
Avatar
Member since May 2011 · 2462 posts · Location: Brisbane
Group memberships: Administrators, Members
Show profile · Link to this post
That's a great summary of the reasons Wikileaks isn't (yet) illegal.  Good find.

I found the following over on techdirt.  Take it with the usual grain of salt of course: these are countries rife with their own corrupt practices exercising a little schadenfreude when the USA stumbles:

The Russian newspaper Pravda says:

Quote by Pravda:
It is the American people who should be outraged that its government has transformed a nation with a reputation for freedom, justice, tolerance and respect for human rights into a backwater that revels in its criminality, cover-ups, injustices and hypocrisies.

And a judge in frickin' Pakistan has a better grasp of the hard lessons than America seems to:

Quote by Pakistan Judge:
"We must bear the truth, no matter how harmful it is."
BLEARGH
This post was edited on 2010-12-15, 09:06 by NFG.
Author name #18
Avatar
User title: Kitten Blaster
Member since Feb 2010 · 89 posts
Group memberships: Citizens, Members
Show profile · Link to this post
Quote by NFG:
And a judge in frickin' Pakistan has a better grasp of the hard lessons than America seems to:

Quote by Pakistan Judge:
"We must bear the truth, no matter how harmful it is."

he has a better grasp than 95% of people on this planet.

oh yeah, when i read the title, "LHC dismisses petition seeking Wikileaks ban" i thought, "what does the large hadron collider have to do with this?"  i'm pretty sure my nerd quotient is up to spec.
Author name (Administrator) #19
Avatar
Member since May 2011 · 2462 posts · Location: Brisbane
Group memberships: Administrators, Members
Show profile · Link to this post
Subject: Wikileaks recap
<merged two Wikileaks threads>

The latest wikileaks news is so exciting, isn't it?  I was just enjoying the ride and didn't feel the need to add my sideline commentary, but today's news from Iceland is fascinating. 

In the wake of MasterCard and Visa's refusal to accept money for Wikileaks, Iceland's demanded to know exactly what legal basis they had for this move, and threatening to review their license to operate there.

Quote by Techdirt:
Of course, I would imagine that Visa and Mastercard both care about keeping the US government more happy than the Icelandic government...

Granted, Iceland is a country of 300,000 people and is quite probably the smallest country where credit cards can be accepted, but wow, when a government demands to know why you're acting like dickheads you know it's time to review your actions.


<small print>Professional asshat Michael Moore offered $20,000 and the use of all his servers in support of Assange and wikileaks.  He's still a dickhead though.


This, from an Economist article, strikes me as a very acceptable explanation for the outraged americans who cannot believe the revealing of their secrets by wikileaks is less than an outrage:

I propose that this sort of exceptionalism helps explain the well-meaning earnestness of America's diplomats, the ubiquity of American surveillance and intervention, as well as the widespread American hostility toward WikiLeaks. Americans by and large trust their military, their foreign service, and even their spy agencies basically because all of them are full of Americans. If the good patriots keeping the world safe for democracy feel they need to keep certain things secret, then they need to keep certain things secret. To splash those secrets all over the internet is simply to interfere with America's attempt to carry its noble burden, to perform its urgent and necessary task, to make the world a little less safe for democracy. What kind of person would do that?

The more plausible that line of thought sounds to you, the more WikiLeaks will strike you as something akin to a terrorist enterprise. But the more you see a hegemonic America as a problem and not a solution, the more WikiLeaks will strike you as a welcome check on a dangerous, out-of-control hyperpower drunk on its own good intentions.

----

By way of Techdirt, this article by Jack Goldsmith is very true:

I think trying to prosecute Assange under the Espionage Act would be a mistake. The prosecution could fail for any number of reasons (no legal violation, extradition impossible, First Amendment). Trying but failing to put Assange in jail is worse than not trying at all. And succeeding will harm First Amendment press protections, make a martyr of Assange, and invite further chaotic Internet attacks. The best thing to do -- I realize that this is politically impossible -- would be to ignore Assange and fix the secrecy system so this does not happen again.

----

From the irony dept: the US State Dept. is hosting press freedom day while, at the same time, attacking wikileaks.  Lol etc. 

This is what America means to me now: short-sighted idiots with no grasp of history adamant that the rules don't apply to their attempts to mold the world in their image.

Mighty, fallen, etc.  =(
BLEARGH
Author name #20
Avatar
Member since Sep 2007 · 176 posts · Location: Kobe, Japan
Group memberships: Citizens, Members, The Cabal, Underground
Show profile · Link to this post
In reply to post ID 3234
*hilarious interlude*
[Image: http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/wikileaks.png]
“Be conservative in what you do; be liberal in what you accept from others.” J. Postel
Author name (Administrator) #21
Avatar
Member since May 2011 · 2462 posts · Location: Brisbane
Group memberships: Administrators, Members
Show profile · Link to this post
Subject: Three Wikileaks updates
A certain random board on 4chan was impressed that xkcd managed to avoid breaking rules 1 & 2.  =)


It certainly comes as no surprise to me that police in Sydney have declined to support a planned wikileaks march.  They'll close the city for days for that horrible Oprah woman but they won't close it for half an hour for freedom and justice.

But it seems the police are using the law as a reason for the refusal: By NSW law, all protests and large gatherings must be approved by the courts if notice is not given more than a week in advance.  Well, they didn't notify them early enough and the cops won't give permission without the court's permission, which hasn't been granted.

On the surface of it, this seems legitimate to me.  I'm not sure what the fuss is about.  The march is still going ahead, apparently.



The editors of many (most?) of Australia's largest news organizations have written a letter to Prime Minster Julia Gillard expressing their support for wikileaks.

I'd like to believe the government is in for a rough ride when the entirety of the press is against their policies.

From the letter:

It is the media’s duty to responsibly report such material if it comes into their possession. To aggressively attempt to shut WikiLeaks down, to threaten to prosecute those who publish official leaks, and to pressure companies to cease doing commercial business with WikiLeaks, is a serious threat to democracy, which relies on a free and fearless press.

----

Naomi Wolf thinks something's up with Julian Assange's detention over rape allegations.

Quote by Naomi Wolf:
Never in twenty-three years of reporting on and supporting victims of sexual assault around the world have I ever heard of a case of a man sought by two nations, and held in solitary confinement without bail in advance of being questioned -- for any alleged rape, even the most brutal or easily proven.

[...]

But for all the tens of thousands of women who have been kidnapped and raped, raped at gunpoint, gang-raped, raped with sharp objects, beaten and raped, raped as children, raped by acquaintances -- who are still awaiting the least whisper of justice -- the highly unusual reaction of Sweden and Britain to this situation is a slap in the face. It seems to send the message to women in the UK and Sweden that if you ever want anyone to take sex crime against you seriously, you had better be sure the man you accuse of wrongdoing has also happened to embarrass the most powerful government on earth.

Interesting times.
BLEARGH
Author name (Administrator) #22
Avatar
Member since May 2011 · 2462 posts · Location: Brisbane
Group memberships: Administrators, Members
Show profile · Link to this post
Subject: Assange's Wanted Poster
Someone linked this the other day.  I don't know the source, but it's quite good:

[Image: http://nfgworld.com/grafx/Assange.jpg]
BLEARGH
Author name (Administrator) #23
Avatar
Member since May 2011 · 2462 posts · Location: Brisbane
Group memberships: Administrators, Members
Show profile · Link to this post
Subject: Weekly Wikileaks Wupdate
Here's the latest roundup of fascinating Wikileaks news.

First, by way of one of my favourite news sources (Techdirt) an article by 'professor Zeynep Tufecki' who says that one of the most important things Wikileaks is teaching us is that it can be very expensive to have your own opinion.

...the increasing control of (relatively) unaccountable corporations and states over the key components of the Internet, and their increased willingness to use this control in politicized ways to impose a "dissent tax" on content they find objectionable.

If they take away your domain name and take away your cheap web hosting and take away your credit card facilities (Visa and Mastercard refuse to work with Wikileaks but work with the KK fucking K!) then it's absolutely true that corporate interests can impose a tax on you for not seeing things their way.

Scary.

In a similar vein, the New York Times recently ran an editorial that says, in a nutshell, we should all be very much alarmed when banks decide to cut off from the world economy any organization they happen not to like.

Techdirt also wonders why US media ignores or barely notices some pretty surprising things done by American agents but is very eager indeed to criticize Wikileaks.  It's all too easy to believe that the American press is being controlled, 'cause these aren't the bloodthirsty pursuers of truth and justice that I always thought they were.

Also from Techdirt, this commentary about Hillary Clinton:

Quote by Techdirt:
Quote by Hillary Clinton:
censorship should not be in any way accepted by any company from anywhere. And in America, American companies need to make a principled stand. This needs to be part of our national brand. I'm confident that consumers worldwide will reward companies that follow those principles.

Others in the administration have been saying similar things. Just this week, the US has been putting pressure on Kuwait for jailing a writer for criticizing the government there.

And yet when it comes to Wikileaks, suddenly, the federal government doesn't seem so interested in supporting such things any more? Hillary Clinton says that companies should stand up for their principles or lose customers... and yet we've seen Amazon, Paypal, Visa and MasterCard do the exact opposite -- with clear pressure from government officials in doing so.  [...]  Less than a year ago, she was telling private companies to have a backbone and stand up for internet freedoms on the basis of principle... and today she's a part of the federal government's pressure campaign to get them to shut down Wikileaks.

And so it goes...
BLEARGH
Author name #24
Avatar
User title: Kitten Blaster
Member since Feb 2010 · 89 posts
Group memberships: Citizens, Members
Show profile · Link to this post
Quote by NFG on 2011-01-05, 16:26:
If they take away your domain name and take away your cheap web hosting and take away your credit card facilities (Visa and Mastercard refuse to work with Wikileaks but work with the KK fucking K!) then it's absolutely true that corporate interests can impose a tax on you for not seeing things their way.

the difference is that wikileaks poses a credible threat and the KKK does not.  the KKK as a bunch of lamers that dress up like ghosts and have no credibility.  however, wikileaks has shown to have trustworthy information in the past which is why the US government is threatened by them.  large corporations are always lobbyists so that they can get laws they want passed by buying off officials. *gasp*  to keep their puppetry status quo, they must appease the puppets.


Quote by Hillary Clinton:
censorship should not be in any way accepted by any company from anywhere. And in America, American companies need to make a principled stand. This needs to be part of our national brand. I'm confident that consumers worldwide will reward companies that follow those principles.

this is really a classic "you lying bitch!" moments.
Close Smaller – Larger + Reply to this post:
Smileys: :-) ;-) :-D :-p :blush: :cool: :rolleyes: :huh: :-/ <_< :-( :'( :#: :scared: 8-( :nuts: :-O
Special characters:
Page:  previous  1  2 
We love UNB by Yves Goergen!